Saturday, 13 September 2008

Recipe - Venison steak with potato/carrot mash and creamed leeks


Some times you need to go wild. Wild in this case meant Venison. The meat is lean and full of flavour. To be honest, eating Bambi's mum doesn't really bother me.

You can prepare the first step of the jus a couple of days ahead and keep it in the fridge until needed and go straight onto step two on the day of cooking.

I wasn't sure really how to plate this and as you can see from the picture I was a bit heavy on the mash. Well, I guess there's always room for improvement. ;)

Ingredients
Jus
500 ml red wine
1 shallot, thinly sliced
200 ml beef or veal stock
3 tbsp Red Cherry Compote
Salt
Pepper
Water if needed

Mash
Potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks of approximately the same size
Carrots, peeled and cut into chunks of approximately the same size
Butter
Double cream
Salt
Pepper

Creamed leeks
1/2 leek, julienned
1 - 2 tbsp butter
2 tbsp double cream
Salt
Pepper
Venison
Venison steak
Olive oil
Salt
Pepper

Method
Jus - step 1
Start by boiling the wine and the shallot slices until it's a syrupy consistency. Add the stock and the cherry compote and let it boil for another couple of minutes. Strain the jus into another container and discard the strained leftovers. Preserve the jus until later.

Mash
Make mash as per normal. Boil the potatoes and carrots together to save stove space and washing up.

Venison
Season the steaks. Heat the oil in a pan until very hot. Add the steaks and cook to your liking. Once cooked, put them to the side to rest and continue with the next two steps.

Jus - step 2
Pour the preserved jus into the frying pan where you fried the venison. Let this boil until it gets a very thick consistency. Taste and add seasoning as and when needed. If it's too strong or too thick - add some water.

Creamed leeks
Melt the butter in a pan, once frothing add the leeks and let it all sweat on medium heat until the leeks are nice and soft. Add the double cream and let it all bubble away for a minute or two. Check and adjust the seasoning all the way through.

Enjoy!

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